EMPIRICAL LABOUR ECONOMICS

Attività formativa monodisciplinare
Codice dell'attività formativa: 
149004-ENG

Scheda dell'insegnamento

Per studenti immatricolati al 1° anno a.a.: 
2018/2019
Insegnamento (nome in italiano): 
EMPIRICAL LABOUR ECONOMICS
Insegnamento (nome in inglese): 
EMPIRICAL LABOUR ECONOMICS
Tipo di attività formativa: 
Attività formativa Affine/Integrativa
Tipo di insegnamento: 
Obbligatoria
Anno di corso: 
1
Anno accademico di offerta: 
2018/2019
Crediti: 
6
Responsabile della didattica: 
Mutuazioni
  • Corso di studi in BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING - Percorso formativo in ACCOUNTING, ACCOUNTABILITY AND GOVERNANCE
  • Corso di studi in INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT, ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND FINANCE - Percorso formativo in MANAGEMENT, ENTREPRENEURSHIP, MARKETING AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Altre informazioni sull'insegnamento

Modalità di erogazione: 
Didattica Convenzionale
Lingua: 
Inglese
Ciclo: 
Secondo Semestre
Obbligo di frequenza: 
No
Ore di attività frontale: 
48
Ore di studio individuale: 
102
Ambito: 
Attività formative affini o integrative
Materiali didattici: 
Prerequisites

None, but some basic microeconomics is useful to fruitfully attend the course.

Educational goals

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the empirical analysis of the labour market, including topics related to human resources management within organizations. More specifically, students will have the chance to both apply some basic statistical and econometric methods to specific topics related to the labour market and to test with real-world data the main labour economics theories.
At the end of the course, the student will be able to: 1) define a research question related to the labor market and/or personnell economics; 2) identify and/or collect data to empirically answer this question; 3) define and implement the empirical analysis; 4) provide some policy recommendations on the basis of the main results.

Course content

1. Introduction to the empirical analysis in labor economics: Identification strategies, data types and collection, measurement issues.
2. Returns to education
3.Labor supply, wage equation and sample selection
4. Incentives in organizations
5. Impact of labor market policies: EPL, unemployment benefits and minimum wage
6. Labor market discrimination.

Textbooks and reading lists

There is not a required textbook, but the following textbook is highly recommended to students who are not familiar with basic labor economics models: Borjas, G. (2015), Labor Economics, McGraw Hill.
The course will be based on the following reading list:
Angrist, J. and A. Krueger (1999). Empirical strategies in labor economics, in Ashenfelter, O. and Card, D. (eds), Handbook of labor economics, Vol 3A, Elsevier, 1277-1366
Ashenfelter, O. C., and C. Rouse (1998). Income, schooling, and ability: Evidence from a new sample of identical twins. Quarterly Journal of Economics 113:253–84.
Bertrand, M., and S. Mullainathan (2004). Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination. American Economic Review, 94(4):991–1013.
Boeri, T., and P. Garibaldi (2006). Two tier reforms of employment protection: A honeymoon effect? Economic Journal 17:357–85.
Caliendo, M., K. Tatsiramos, and A. Uhlendorff (2013). Benefits duration, unemployment duration and job match quality: A regression discontinuity approach.” Journal of Applied Econometrics 28: 604 – 627.
Card, D. (1999). The causal effect of education on earnings, in Ashenfelter, O. and Card, D. (eds), Handbook of labor economics, Vol 3A, Elsevier,1801-1863.
Card, D., and A. Krueger (1994). Minimum wage, and employment: A case study of the fast food industry in NewJersey and Pennsylvania. American Economic Review 84 (4): 772–93.
Heckman, J., (1993). What has been learned about labor supply in the past twenty years?. American Economic Review 83 (2), 116-121.
Neumark, D., and W. Wascher. (2000). Minimum wages: A case study of the fast food industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania; Comment. American Economic Review 90: 1362–96.
Lalive, R. (2007). Unemployment benefits, duration and post-unemployment jobs. American Economic Review 97:2 (2007): 108 –112.
Lalive, R., J. C. van Ours, and J. Zweimüller (2006). How changes in financial incentives affect the duration of unemployment. Review of Economic Studies 73:1009–38.
Lazear, E. (2000). Performance Pay and productivity. American Economic Review, 90(5): 1346-1361.
Lucifora, C. and F. Origo (2015). Performance-Related Pay and Firm Productivity: Evidence from a Reform in the Structure of Collective Bargaining”, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 68(3): 603-632.
Riach, P. A., and J. Rich (2006). An experimental investigation of sexual discrimination in hiring in the English labor market. BE Press Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, 6(2), Article 1.
An updated reading list, with additional elective papers, will be published on the e-learning page of the course.

Teaching methods

Frontal lectures supported by applied labs in which students will have the chance to replicate some of the empirical studies discussed during lectures.

Assessment and Evaluation

Empirical project (40% of the final mark) and final written test (60% of the final mark).
The final test will consist of open questions on the topics covered by the course.
A minimum score of 18/30 in both the empirical project and the written test is required to pass the course.