EMPIRICAL INDUSTRIAL DYNAMICS

Attività formativa monodisciplinare
Codice dell'attività formativa: 
149003-ENG

Scheda dell'insegnamento

Per studenti immatricolati al 1° anno a.a.: 
2019/2020
Insegnamento (nome in italiano): 
EMPIRICAL INDUSTRIAL DYNAMICS
Insegnamento (nome in inglese): 
EMPIRICAL INDUSTRIAL DYNAMICS
Tipo di attività formativa: 
Attività formativa Affine/Integrativa
Tipo di insegnamento: 
Obbligatoria
Settore disciplinare: 
ECONOMIA APPLICATA (SECS-P/06)
Anno di corso: 
1
Anno accademico di offerta: 
2019/2020
Crediti: 
6
Responsabile della didattica: 
Altri docenti: 
Mutuazioni
  • Corso di studi in BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, PROFESSIONAL AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING - Percorso formativo in ACCOUNTING, ACCOUNTABILITY AND GOVERNANCE
  • Corso di studi in INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT, ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND FINANCE - Percorso formativo in MANAGEMENT, ENTREPRENEURSHIP, MARKETING AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Altre informazioni sull'insegnamento

Modalità di erogazione: 
Didattica Convenzionale
Lingua: 
Inglese
Ciclo: 
Secondo Semestre
Obbligo di frequenza: 
No
Ore di attività frontale: 
48
Ore di studio individuale: 
102
Ambito: 
Attività formative affini o integrative
Materiali didattici: 
Prerequisites

A good knowledge in Statistics 1 and 2 or Statistics for Management

Educational goals

The aim of the course is: *to provide the students an in depth knowledge on i) the mechanisms behind industrial change/transformation caused by the innovative processes developed at the micro-level; ii) the dynamics through which firms enter and exit the market; iii) the main theories on firm growth and its determinants; *to make the students familiar with the research frontier studies in Industrial Dynamics and the most relevant empirical studies in Industrial Dynamics. *to make the students able to apply the theoretical knowledge developed during the course to real firm-level data for a deep and thorough understanding of the industrial dynamics. *to provide the knowledge base necessary for independent qualified analyses – and economic/management implementation - of processes and strategies related to industrial and technical change on different systems levels.

Course content

The course is constituted by lectures on specific topics and corresponding tutorials that develop and apply on real data of firms the topics of the lectures. *Introduction. What is Industrial Dynamics, and why it is important to study Industrial Dynamics. *Innovation. Innovation as one of the central manifestations of change. Invention and Innovation. Definition of innovation. The classification of the innovations. Appropriability and Technological Opportunity. *The Diffusion of Innovation and Sectoral Patterns.Technological Paradigms and Trajectories. Technological Regimes. Pavitt’s Taxonomy. *Industrial Demography. The phenomena of Entry, Exit and Survival of firms. Merger and Acquisitions and spin-offs. *Firm Growth and Gibrat’s Law. Is firm growth completely erratic? (Gibrat’s Law). Empirical evidence. Relation with a lognormal size distribution.

Textbooks and reading lists

J. Fagerberg, DC. Mowery, R.R. Nelson (eds.) (2006), The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford University Press: Oxford, U.K. (some chapters).
B.H. Hall and N. Rosenberg (eds.) (2009), Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, North-Holland: Amsterdam, vol.1 (some chapters).
Additional readings will be assigned during the course

Teaching methods

The course is held partly in the form of formal lectures given by the professor, and partly in the form of students’ presentations and joint discussion of some assignments on data analysis concerning the theoretical topics. Student’s assignments are done by groups of normally 2 , maximum 3 persons. The teaching includes the training to team and individual work practices for the preparation and the communication of the papers/data analysis assigned to them. The students are trained to use bibliographic references and quotations, to search for relevant sources, to analyse real firm level data and to check unclear content. Class presentations challenge the students to confront the communication dynamics, both as actors and as spectators, taking the chance to evaluate the strength and the weaknesses of the  performances.

Assessment and Evaluation

The final evaluation is given by:
1.The presentation in class of an assignment done by groups of 2 (maximum 3) students. Students' presentations assess: *The correct understanding of the topic. *The identification of the key issues and of the priority order. *The capacity to summarise the relevant content. *The strength and systematic storytelling; *The effectiveness of the slides.
The evaluation of students’ presentations/assignments counts the 50% of the final grade and it takes into consideration the active participation of the student during the lectures and other students’ presentations.
2. The written exam at the end of the course concerns the contents of the lectures and the required readings. It counts 50% of the final grade.The written exam consists of open questions and/or multiple-choice questions. The written exam assesses: *The correct learning of the concepts of the programme's topics. *The accuracy of the answers and the capacity of summarising the relevant concepts. *The capacity of understanding and explaining complex issues. *The effectiveness of the written exposition.
The students who are not able to give the class presentation/assignments should prepare for the exam more chapters of the two textbooks than those assigned to students that are able to present their team work in class. They will be evaluated according to the written exam (see above point 2), and an oral exam, which will follow straight on in the same session if the students get a sufficient grade in the written exam. The oral exam focuses on the standard programme and on the additional readings.

Further information

The students are invited to enroll in the course on the e-learning platform, Moodle, where the slide, the supplementary material and all the up-dates will be published.